Common Wood Finishes for Furniture & Flooring

Beyond their capabilities to create biodiverse ecosystems and turn greenhouse gases into clean oxygen, trees also provide one of the most versatile materials on the planet- wood. In addition to being used by carpenters and builders for framing houses, wood is perhaps most commonly used for furniture and flooring, here in the US and around the world.

When properly maintained, wood lasts a long time- generations. But part of maintaining wood means adding a finish. Using a finish on wood furniture and flooring helps modulate the humidity content of the wood. When wood dries out too much, it is prone to cracking and splitting, so it’s important to seal in the appropriate moisture content.

There are lots of options for finishing wood, but when it comes to furniture and flooring, most products fall into one of these categories: oils, varnishes, polyurethanes, lacquers, and waxes.

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Wood Stains from Copeland Furniture

Copeland Audrey Table

If you’re not familiar with Copeland Furniture, they’re one of the leading manufacturers of modern and mid century furniture in the country. Located in Bradford, Vermont, Copeland was founded in 1976 by Tim Copeland.

Copeland offers furniture in cherry, walnut, maple, oak, and ash woods, and they use a clear, non-toxic lacquer as a wood finish.

In addition to offering furniture in several popular domestic hardwoods, Copeland also offers stained finishes on most of their collections. Here are their stain options for cherry, maple, ash, and oak (walnut is not typically stained due to its natural color).

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Wood Stains from Lyndon Furniture

If you’re not familiar with Lyndon Furniture, they’re one of the leading furniture makers in the state of Vermont. Founded by Dave Allard in 1976, Lyndon has spent the last several decades producing some of the highest quality furniture in New England.

Most of the furniture made at Lyndon is available in cherry, maple, oak, and walnut, and they use a clear, non-toxic lacquer as a wood finish. We also offer several stain options on cherry, maple, and oak (we don’t recommend staining walnut).

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

5 of the Best Oil Finishes for Wood Furniture

Last updated on April 13th, 2022 at 09:15 am

Oil finishes are commonly used on wood furniture and kitchen utensils. Generally speaking, oil finishes are eco-friendly, food-safe, and non-toxic. They’re also easy to repair and produce a more textured grain pattern than many alternatives. They tend to be considered a more traditional finish, as oils have been used as wood finishes for thousands of years. However, oil finishes generally don’t offer the same level of protection and durability that you’d find with a lacquer or varnish.

Here are five of the most commonly used oil finishes:

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This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.