Front Door Feng Shui: What is Your Door Saying?

Last updated on October 20th, 2017 at 05:10 pm

Did you know that we recently painted the front doors of Stonehurst? We decided on a color that was bright, unique, and fitting to the beauty of the space. In the spirit of our newest renovation, this blog post explains some common symbolism behind several eclectic front door colors.

What is the symbolism of a red door?
Red… bold,  fierce!

1. Red: In Feng Shui, a red door means “welcome!” It’s full of powerful, warm energy. According to folklore, if a weary traveler stumbled upon a home with a red door, they would stop there and surely be welcomed with a good meal and a good nights sleep. A red door is great for people who have lots of guests visiting their home, and who aren’t afraid to make a statement.

What does a blue front door symbolize?
Blue…intention, creation, prosperity!

2. Blue:  As you can imagine, the color blue inspires a feeling of calm and peace to those who see it, and beyond that, a blue door welcomes abundance, growth,  and prosperity! Feng Shui suggests that when you walk through a blue door, you can more easily concentrate, focus on personal endeavors, and practice creativity!

What does a yellow door symbolize?
Yellow… clarity, intellect, happiness!

3. Yellow: Yellow can cheer you up, fill you with hope, and give you enhanced mental clarity. It also has a warm, nurturing tone. Use a yellow door if you want your home to always be a happy retreat from the outside world.

what does a green door say about you?
Green… Natural, Balanced, Transformative.

4. Green: Green is representative of earth, and brings in a feeling of the natural world. Green is associated with growth, balance, and total harmony. Use a green door if you always want to feel a little closer to mother earth!

What does a purple door symbolize?
Purple… relaxed, spiritual, inquisitive.

5. Purple: Purple is actually one of the most popular front door colors, surprisingly! Purple or violet hued doors are commonly associated with spiritual energy, and relaxed, meditative spaces. Sometimes purple doors are used in religious spaces like temples and churches! Purple would be an ideal color for you if you use your home as a low-energy place for quiet, spiritual contemplation, and meditation.

What does a white door mean in feng shui?
White…new, clean, fresh!

6. White: As you can probably imagine, a white door symbolizes purity, tradition, & freshness. It’s a color that represents things that are untouched and clean! Painting your door white is a good idea if you are someone who loves traditional style, or someone who wants to keep your home looking pristine. Some people say that if you are looking for a fresh start, or if you have just started a new phase in your life whether it be a marriage, a new baby, or a new job– to paint your door white to “start over” and reflect your new life!

 

Want to know which one of these colors we decided on for the front doors of Stonehurst? Keep your eye out for a new blog, coming early next week! 🙂

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Renovating Stonehurst with Vermont Made Products

Last updated on December 3rd, 2018 at 02:25 pm

Stonehurst | Renovation of Vermont Furniture Showcase
We’ve been careful to restore, reuse and re-purpose as much as we could from the original Stonehurst farmhouse. Where we needed new materials for the renovation, we sourced local Vermont made products whenever possible. This is a Vermont Castings stove, made in Bethel VT. It’s sitting on a Vermont slate hearth stone mined in Poultney VT. The mantle was made by a craftsman in Walpole NH (oops.. just across the border, though) from Vermont cherry wood. Chairs in the foreground are made by Jim Geier of Vermont Folk Rocker in Starksboro VT.

It’s been almost a year now since we purchased Stonehurst, the 200+ year old farmhouse we’ve grown to know and love. From the beginning when we first conceptualized this showcase of Vermont’s best handmade furniture, fine art and home decor accessories we decided to renovate with local products. We worked with Brattleboro architect Jeremy Coleman and Spofford builder, Bob Furlone (American Construction) to reuse and re-purpose everything we could in an effort to keep Stonehurst authentic. And when we needed to purchase building materials new, we sourced Vermont made products where possible.

Dennis, Heather B, Kelsey and I have written many Stonehurst blog posts describing the details of how we renovated and where materials came from. But I wanted to do a final run-down to recognize and thank the Vermont companies that made Stonehurst the authentic showcase it is today. Here’s the list:

  • Windows were custom handcrafted to match original designs, by Green Mountain Window in Rutland, VT
  • The maple and cherry hardwood in our floors was harvested and milled locally by Kerber Farms Mill and Lumber in Guilford, VT. Joe Dhembe in Newfane, VT installed the floors.
  • Original wood floors were too fragile to reuse, but Bob Furlone’s American Construction crew (Scott Strong Superintendent, Martha Ratcliff, Chuck Johns, Patrick Devens, Howard Bassett, Ketch Greene) were able to salvage, clean and re-purpose them as beautiful rustic ceilings
  • Interior painting and some exterior painting was done by W R Painting Inc in Ashulot, NH
  • Exterior painting was also done by Moe Momany Painting in Brattleboro, VT
  • Slate floors were mined in Poultney, VT and installed by Albert diBiccari of AD Ceramic Tile, Marlborough NH
  • 2 gas stoves and a wood stove were made by Vermont Castings in Bethel, VT
  • Custom steel railings for the stairwell were period designed and handmade by Richard Crawford of Vermont Steelcraft
  • Jeremy’s decorative porch rafters and the cherry fireplace mantle were crafted by Walpole Cabinetry in Walpole NH
  • We left original beams in place wherever possible, but some new beams were needed. They were sustainably harvested and hand-hewn by Vermont Timberworks in Springfield, VT
  • Brattleboro’s engineering firm, Stevens and Associates designed the site plan
  • Local excavator, Carey Tyler of Tyler Excavation did all the site work
  • A handful of trees had to be taken down because they were leaning over the building. Turner and Renaud Tree Service fell the trees and local sawyer, Vince Johnson brought his portable sawmill over to slice and dice the wood.
  • Carroll Concrete of Vernon VT poured the new concrete foundation which shores up the old stone foundation
  • Masonry, stone wall repair and construction of the new stone wall along our ADA accessible ramp out front was artfully performed by Scott Sartoria of SKS Masonry in Keene, NH
  • A new standing seam metal roof over the renovated sections of Stonehurst was installed by Rohr Cook of Chester, VT. Soon Rohr will be repairing the old slate roof on the other side of Stonehurst
  • Landscaping is being designed now by Gordon Hayward of Hayward Gardens in Putney, VT.  Torben Larsen of Windham Growers in Putney VT will be installing stone pathways, trees, shrubs and gardens.  Our fabulous crew of summer interns have been helping with landscaping.  They are Jimmy Mills and Douglas’ children– Trenton, Taegen and Tristan Fletcher.

A million thanks to all of you for making Stonehurst the special place it is!  I must also thank Vermont taxpayers and the people who worked on the Vermont Working Lands Grant Initiative.  Earlier this year they awarded Vermont Woods Studios a $100,000 grant to help complete the Stonehurst project.

To follow through on our “all things Vermont” theme, we are now working with local artisans to adorn the inside of Stonehurst with Vermont made fine furniture, artwork and home decor items. Soon you will be able to see that, plus lighting by Hubbardton Forge, glassware and pottery by Simon Pearce and pewter by Danforth Pewter all under one roof. Come visit and enjoy!

 

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Vermont Furniture Makers: Wages and Income

Last updated on May 4th, 2018 at 03:04 pm

Vermont Furniture Makers | Wages and Income Discussion
I took this photo earlier this year of some of the master craftsmen responsible for the best of Vermont Made furniture.  From left:  Bill Laberge, Bob Gasperetti, Steve Holman and Dan Mosheim.  Each has a woodworking shop, quite typical of Vermont’s independent furniture makers.*

One of the best things about running a sustainable furniture business is that our customers are people who care about how we treat the environment and the people we work with.  They’ve come to us because they are willing to pay a premium for high quality, American made furniture that’s crafted from sustainably harvested wood– by furniture makers who are paid a fair, livable wage.

Yesterday we received this note from Wayne J:

I appreciated the description of your commitment to sustainability. I would also like to know how you care for the artisans and trades people who build and ship the furniture. What percentage of the price flows to these people? Are they paid a living wage? What is the ratio of their pay to that of the CEO? Are they making enough to create for themselves safe environments for doing their work. For me to do repeat business at this price point, it will be important to have answers to these questions as well.

These are great questions.  I would ask the same thing if I was a customer and I thought you might be interested in the answers, so I decided to post them here.  I’ll break it down into Compensation and Occupational Safety & Health.

Compensation

Vermont Woods Studios is set up as a marketing and sales company.  We actually don’t build much furniture anymore (we started out with Ken building furniture but as we grew, he couldn’t keep up, so we got him doing the bookkeeping instead).  So we don’t directly employ furniture makers.  We work with independent Vermont furniture makers, either buying furniture wholesale and selling retail or via commission or referral fees.

From the beginning, we set Vermont Woods Studios up as a mission-driven company, that is:  To conserve forests and artistic woodworking while providing our customers with the best selection, value, quality and service available for Vermont made wood furniture.

Because Ken is a woodworker, we are well aware of the amount of time and effort that goes into a piece of handcrafted furniture.  We have a middle ground to walk between helping Vermont furniture companies and craftspeople achieve high quality jobs and providing our customers with the best value for their furniture.  All the while we must compensate our marketing, sales and web development staff as best we can.

As for the CEO’s salary… well that would be mine.  I haven’t actually taken a salary yet, per se.  We are in our 8th year at Vermont Woods Studios and as other small business owners will attest, much of the early years involves investing and rolling profits back into the business, rather than taking a salary.  For now, I am sustained with the knowledge that if we meet our challenge of creating efficiencies in the Vermont furniture making and shipping system, we’ll end up with a win-win-win-win situation: for woodworkers, customers, Vermont Woods Studios employees (including me) and the environment.

Occupational Safety and Health

Vermont has the highest environmental standards of any state in the nation.  As for the safety and health of the woodworkers that craft furniture for Vermont Woods Studios, I believe all the companies we work with (both large and small) go above and beyond federal and state OSHA and EPA regulations.  Prior to starting this company I worked in environmental and occupational health and safety for 20+ years, with my most recent work in this occupation was at Tulane’s Center for Applied Environmental Public Health.  That experience, plus the fact that Ken has an active woodworking shop gives me confidence in my assessment of the safety and health protections our woodworking partners employ.  I do realize that we have to take a more active role in documenting safety, health and sustainability compliance amongst our partners in the future, though.

If you’re interested in additional details regarding sustainability, livable wages and worker safety at Vermont Woods Studios, please browse through our fine furniture website to learn about:

and give me a call or email me to suggest ways for us to continually improve.

* Not all of our craftspeople have their own businesses.  Many work for larger companies, like Copeland Furniture.  Read more about sustainability and the treatment of craftspeople at Copeland Furniture here.

considered proprietary information

according tothe Vermont Department of Labor, the average annual salary for a Vermont woodworker is $ 32,440

http://www.vtlmi.info/oic3.cfm?occcode=51709900#wage

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Stonehurst Before and After: Exterior Paint Makeover

Last updated on May 4th, 2018 at 03:49 pm

Stonehurst Fine Furniture Showroom | Before and After | Exterior Paint Colors
Stonehurst Fine Furniture Showroom, about a year ago in Summer 2012.  I do love the classic barn-red Vermont country look, but it was time for a change.

OK, Sally Blakley and other dear readers: I can explain. I know I asked for your opinion on the exterior paint makeover for Stonehurst. And I know you voted overwhelmingly to keep the old barn-red color. And I loved that classic look too. But…

Stonehurst Fine Furniture Gallery | Before and After Photos of Exterior Paint
The exterior paint makeover of our Stonehurst Fine Furniture Gallery restored the farmhouse to it’s original, circa 1790 white color.  We chose traditional indigo colored front doors, although I have to admit they probably weren’t that color 200+ years ago.

We have a couple things going on that swayed my decision off in the opposite direction. First of all, there’s the landscaping. You may have read about the plans we’re making with Gordon Hayward (landscape architect) and Torben Larsen (landscaper and stone mason) to add colorful lilacs, hydrangeas, peonies, lavender and all sorts of other wonderful plants to the front yard.

Second, we’ve been trying to renovate Stonehurst as authentically as possible. We’ve recycled, re-invigorated and reused existing parts and filled in with local Vermont made components whenever we needed something new.

And, well… the original color of Stonehurst back circa 1790 was farmhouse white. Lastly, there’s the matter of our green and white logo, as you can see on the sign. Don’t you think there’s some harmony going on between the sign and the white house with nature’s greenery all around?

Let me know what you think on our Facebook and we’ll duke it out there. In the meantime, if you’re interested in painting your own house, check out these 13 Dramatic Exterior Paint Makeovers on Houzz. Then post your own before and after photos for all of us to see!

 

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Love Wood Furniture? Learn 3 Ways to Save America’s Hardwoods

Last updated on March 13th, 2019 at 05:29 pm

Hardwood Furniture | Saving Our Maple Trees | Sustainable Forestry in Vermont
The little red dot in the middle of these hardwood trees, is Ken–  pruning the maples today.  Our mission at Stonehurst Fine Wood Furniture is founded on forest conservation.  We need your help in saving hardwood trees from an epidemic of infestations.

Hard wood furniture lovers, beware!  At this very moment, armies of invasive bugs and diseases are on the prowl, hunting down your favorite maple, oak, cherry, walnut and other backyard trees to turn them into food and bedding for their young.  Check out this article by Faith Campbell in the Nature Conservancy blog, “How to Save Countless Trees in 10 Minutes or Less“.

Asian Longhorn Beetle

Asian Longhorn Beetle | How to Identify it on Your Hardwood TreesFaith talks about the dreaded Asian Longhorn Beetle ALB, one of many non-native insects and diseases that have been brought to America accidentally by way of imported plants or in crates and pallets.  Vermont’s iconic maples, along with elms, ash, and oaks are a favorite home to these large, shiny, black and white beetles from Asia.

The entire Northern hardwood forest is at risk and if we can’t get people like you to help fight back,  48 million acres in the United States plus the majority of Canada’s hardwood forests could be destroyed.  Also at risk are shade trees along city streets and in backyards all across the country. The ALB could kill up to two thirds of urban trees if it becomes established!

 

 

3 Things You Can Do to Save Our Hardwoods

There are many ways you can help keep invasive killer bugs and diseases from destroying our hardwoods.  Here are some suggestions from VermontInvasives.org

  • Buy Local Firewood– Tree killing insects and diseases can lurk in firewood. Don’t move invasives to new areas on firewood
  • Educate yourself, your friends, your coworkers, and your family about how to look for invasive pests.  Here’s a look at the top invasives in Vermont and in other locales
  • Take photos and report anything you find to your state agricultural, natural resources, or forestry agency

By working together can we fight the killer bugs that threaten our forests, our food supplies, our waters and the thousands of jobs dependent on them.  You can help stop the spread and protect the natural resources you love.

 

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Stonehurst Before and After: The Warming Hut

Last updated on March 13th, 2019 at 05:27 pm

Stonehurst Before and After: The Warming Hut | Fine Furniture Gallery
Stonehurst Before: The Warming Hut aka Tool Shed when this property was a southern Vermont ski area called Pine Top. Today Stonehurst has been transformed into a fine furniture and art gallery showcasing the best of Vermont’s handmade made home decor items.

Here’s a fun set of before and after pictures of Stonehurst, taken at the “Warming Hut”.  I guess this before snapshot must have been taken around 1950-1960 when Stonehurst was “Pine Top” a local ski area.  At that time, before mega ski resorts came along, about 2/3 of the towns in Vermont had their own local ski area.  Vernon’s Pine Top had 3 rope tows and prior to that a couple “horse tows” (isn’t that awesome– I’m trying to find a picture of that!).

Pine Top’s “tool shed” aka “warming hut” was located behind the Stonehurst house we currently occupy as Vermont Woods Studios Fine Furniture.  Inside the shed there was room for a few tables and a grill where our friend, Chris Howe cooked hamburgers for hungry skiers.

Chris Howe at the Stonehurst Warming Hut | Now a Fine Furniture Gallery
Our friend, Chris Howe at the moss-covered stone foundation that use to be Pine Top’s Warming Hut. She’s remembering her job as a cook, grilling hamburgers for hungry skiers.

Chris visited us a couple weeks ago and reminisced  a bit.  She and I walked out to the stone foundation where the warming hut used to be.  It’s now covered with beautiful green moss.  That’s Chris sitting at the picnic table, looking over the hills that she and her family used to ski through to get home after work.

What fun!  Customers coming to Stonehurst to shop for fine furniture in the winter should pack their cross country skis and maybe a bottle of Bailey’s or a hot toddy.  Then we’ll give Chris a call and see if we can’t tap a few more of those memories of Pine Top’s heyday.

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Landscaping Stonehurst with Gordon Hayward

Last updated on March 13th, 2019 at 05:25 pm

Stonehurst Landscaping | Gordon Hayward | Fine Furniture Gallery
Gordon Hayward of Hayward Gardens sketches out a few landscaping ideas for Stonehurst, Vermont’s newest fine furniture and art gallery.  Our pal Annette Roydon has volunteered to be our on-site advisor.

Well, now that the exterior painting of Stonehurst (Vermont’s newest fine furniture and art gallery) is almost done (pictures to follow later this week), it’s time to look into landscaping.  We were fortunate to be able to persuade Brattleboro’s best painters (Moe Momaney and crew) to help us out and they in turn recommended the area’s most admired landscaper.  That would be Gordon Hayward of Hayward Gardens.

Annette, Douglas and I met with Gordon the other day and roughed out a few preliminary sketches.  Boy are they different from our previous plans!  Gordon got here just in the nick of time.

At the moment, designing the ADA accessible walkway into the front of Stonehurst is the main dilemma we’re facing.  We all envision a lovely, traditional Vermont stone pathway, constructed by a skilled stone mason using Goshen stone.  Jeremy Coleman, the Stonehurst architect has already laid the pathway foundation with the proper gentle slope to make wheelchair access easy.  The problem is that in the winter, it’s hard to snow-blow a stone-inlaid path and Ken’s afraid that over time the walkway will become bumpy and difficult for wheelchair access.

Before talking to Gordon we had decided to pave the walkway and stamp it so it looks like Goshen stone.  Well, both Jeremy and Gordon feel like all the work we’ve done in making sure Stonehurst is authentic will be compromised by paving the entrance.  They are certain that Goshen stone can be properly laid such that it will stay level and intact for smooth wheelchair access.

What do you think?  Gordon is coming over tomorrow to continue our landscaping project.  You can put your 2 cents in on our Fine Furniture Facebook page.  And I’ll keep you updated here on the blog.

And here’s a couple interesting links for you:

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Discover Vermont Artists at the Southern Vermont Art and Craft Festival

Last updated on March 13th, 2019 at 05:24 pm

Click photo for source. Southern Vermont Art and Craft Festival.

Vermont’s most popular summer art and craft festival begins today! We’re proud of Vermont for its amazing support of its craftsman and artists, which is why we are super excited about the Southern Vermont Art and Craft Festival. The festival had been hosted in Manchester for 30 years, but the 2013 festival will be held in Bennington, Vermont! This provides advantages because its in a more southern region of Vermont, which will hopefully bring in a larger turnout than in previous years! The festival will host over 160 talented artists who will display and sell their one of a kind artwork, as well as traditional and contemporary crafts, and pottery!

From Friday, August 2nd to Sunday, August 4th, this three day event will run in conjunction with the town wide Bennington Arts Festival Weekend. The festival is put on by a variety of community arts organizations and venues, so expect a jam packed weekend with live music, art, and activities ranging from art walks, open studios and receptions, live entertainers, and a historical architecture exhibit! As always, you can expect lots of kid friendly activities, local food vendors, ice cream,craft beer, and more!

If you don’t have plans for the weekend, why not add the Southern Vermont Art and Craft festival to your agenda and find some inspiration in the work of talented Vermont artists!

 

 

 

 

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Momany Painters Hard at Work at Stonehurst

Last updated on August 8th, 2013 at 10:29 am

 

Moe Momaney, Painter | Brattleboro Vermont | Stonehurst Before and After
Moe Momaney, a Painter from Brattleboro, Vermont and his crew are painting the exterior of Stonehurst, Vermont’s newest Fine Furniture and Art Gallery.

Here’s an update on the exterior painting at Stonehurst.  A couple weeks ago I polled you on what your preference was for the exterior paint color.  The response was an overwhelming preference for RED.  What’s up with that?  I was hoping to restore Stonehurst to it’s former self.  It was a white farmhouse for 150 years or so before it’s life as Pine Top, Vernon’s local ski area in the 1940s – 1960s.

When Moe Momaney and his crew are finished I’ll post pictures of the New Do.  It’s not too late to register your vote though, if you haven’t already.  Keep in mind there will be lots of flowers and landscaping in front of the house.  In fact, today we’ll be meeting with Gordon Hayward, a landscape designer from Hayward Gardens in Putney, VT.  I’ll report on that front later this week.

 

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.

Stonehurst Before and After: Kitchen to Sunroom Makeover

Last updated on March 13th, 2019 at 05:20 pm

Vermont Furniture Showroom | Before the Renovation
The country kitchen at Stonehurst, as it was for many years.  Traditional pine cupboards and appliances were perfect when Stonehurst served as a farmhouse, boarding house, four seasons resort, ski area and private residence. 

We’re trucking right along in our quest to transform Stonehurst from a private residence to a fine furniture and art gallery that showcases Vermont made sustainable home decor products.  There are a whole host of finishing touches still in progress but I thought I’d share some before and after pictures of spaces where the renovation is pretty well complete.  First up:  the kitchen, my personal favorite part of the transformation.  The “before” kitchen was functional but the layout didn’t provide much opportunity for windows to overlook the spectacular view out back.

Vermont Furniture Showroom | Stonehurst Before and After
Now Stonehurst is a fine furniture and art gallery, showcasing Vermont made sustainable home decor products, so no kitchen is needed.  We replaced the cabinets and appliances with windows and an open atrium to take advantage of the view.

Since the kitchen is the entry into the building, we wanted to treat our customers to a cheerful space where they could relax and unwind after a long trip up from the city (customers usually travel from Boston, New York, Washington DC and beyond).  The wall of windows we installed puts Vermont’s green mountains and meadows  front and center when customers step inside.  It’s pretty clear:  you’re in Vermont now.  Time to slow down and enjoy nature at it’s finest.

Where Does Wood furniture Come From?

With sustainable forestry being at the heart of our mission at Vermont Woods Studios, one of the main things we’re trying to do with Stonehurst is raise awareness about where your furniture comes from.  So the view of Vermont’s Green Mountain Forest often opens up a conversation about legally, sustainably harvested wood.  Loryn is working on an educational display which will be installed on the sunroom wall to tell the story of how our furniture gets from sustainably-managed forests to your home.

Kudos to Our Design and Construction Team

I can’t start showing before and after photos without recognizing and thanking our architect, Jeremy Coleman of Brattleboro, VT and builder, Bob Furlone of American Construction.  They have done a tremendous job, especially in facing all the realities involved in transforming and modernizing a 200+ year old farmhouse.  They’ve also been really knowledgeable in helping us select all Vermont made materials whenever possible.  The wall of windows shown above was custom made by Green Mountain Window in Rutland VT and the slate floor was mined locally by Vermont Slate Company.

Let me know what you think of the transformation in the comments section below or on Facebook.  Over the next couple weeks, I’ll post before and after photos of the:

  • barn–now a dining room showroom
  • boarding house– now a bedroom showroom
  • kids bedroom– now a kitchenette for our staff
  • several bedrooms– now administrative offices”
  • exterior paint color– from red to white, and
  • the parlor– which is still a parlor

I hope you’ll be as excited about this new Vermont fine furniture and art gallery as we are.  Come and visit us to see it all up close and personal!  Be sure to bring a bottle of wine and a picnic lunch so you can sit out back and enjoy the view.

Already following our Blog? For more info sign up for our e-newsletter

Sign up now

This blog is written by your friends at Vermont Woods Studios. Check out our Vermont made furniture and home decor online and visit our showroom and art gallery at Stonehurst, the newly restored 1800s farmhouse nestled in the foothills of the Green Mountains.